Bird Control with the Jumpo Trainer

 

Jumpos were originally created to stop migratory seabirds from roosting on boats. Migratory waterfowl are federally and internationally protected, so any device for keeping birds off boats cannot injure the birds! Numerous tests were conducted in Hawaii with the consent and cooperation of local U.S. Fish and Wildlife and U.S. Department of Agriculture officials. They agreed that Jumpos would be permissible to use.

As I mentioned earlier, Jumpos can sting your hand. And they move with such rapidity, many people ask "Don't they ever break a bird's wing?" Extensive videos have been taken and what they show is that the birds, being light weight, are actually thrown off the units. No incident of damage to a bird was ever recorded.

Plan your placement on your observations of bird messes and general bird activity.

On a 30 foot sailboat, 12 Jumpos kept birds from messing. The figure to the right shows the placement.

Tie one end of the Anchor Cord thru one keyhole on each Jumpo and the other end of the Anchor Cord to railings, cleats, etc. so your Jumpo will not be lost since it might leap off the surface it is resting on. Don’t allow the Jumpo to fall into the sea.

 

The new 30' trimaran shown at left immediately became a target boat. Initially 36 JUMPOs were placed onboard. After the first night - 5 Jumpos were set off, after the second night - 3 set off, after the third night - 1 set off, then none! After two weeks only 12 Jumpos used - no messes. After about 1-1/2 months, all Jumpos were removed with only minor to no messes weekly.

Ron Darby,
Oahu, HI

 
Protected by the Jumpo Trainer

Boat being protected by Jumpo Trainers. Tie-downs (included with the Jumpos) were used to prevent the Jumpos from jumping off of the boat.

This boat (to the left), located within 100' of the messy boat (shown below, left), has had negligible messes over the last 11 years. This boat had always been a bird-favored boat, but Jumpo Trainers have kept them off. When a new flock arrives, 6 to 10 Jumpos are placed and checked at least once during the first week, resetting sprung Jumpos. All Jumpos are removed after about one month after the birds have settled elsewhere.

 

   
An unprotected boat
Shore Birds spend nights on favored moored boats with typical weekly messes shown to the left often requiring over 2 hours clean up.
   
Using Jumpos to defend a deck against messy birds.
 

Birds around the house
Jumpo trainers can be used on porches, decks and lanais including furniture, and on window sills and other areas you’d prefer birds not land. The more Jumpos, the greater the chance that a bird will set one off.

Plan your Jumpo layout on your observations of bird messes and general bird activity. Roughly, estimate about one Jumpo per 10 square feet of floor area, plus at least one for each furniture item. On a high-rise porch 4 feet by 17 feet with two chairs, a table, and a wall A/C unit; 12-15 Jumpos worked very well to keep pigeons away. See figure to right.

Tie one end of the Anchor Cord thru one keyhole on each Jumpo and the other end of the Anchor Cord to furniture, railings, etc. so your Jumpo will not be lost since it might leap off the porch or deck. A Jumpo falling from a porch or window sill in a highrise building could injure people below. So please use the anchor cords.

Place a sign "CAUTION - JUMPO TRAINERS AT WORK" so it is clearly seen in an area where Jumpos are set, such as at an access point to the deck or on a boat cockpit.

It is our experience that if you reset most of the set-off Jumpos in the layout during the first day or so, you can train the resident birds to move to areas without Jumpos, and only limited monitoring is needed thereafter. The time it takes to permanently get rid of birds depends upon how established the birds were originally and the degree of monitoring of the JUMPO layout.